BUS FPX 3011 Assessment 3 Leading and Managing
Phillip February 27, 2024 No Comments

BUS FPX 3011 Assessment 3 Leading and Managing

BUS FPX 3011 Assessment 3 Leading and Managing

Name

Capella university

BUS-FPX3011 Fundamentals of Management

Prof. Name

Date

 

Leading and Managing

Managers and leaders are often considered to be the same. When thought of, the roles are considered forms of motivation and action together; however, a manager and leader exhibit one of those two concepts. Managers are defined as being responsible for controlling or administering all or parts of a company, organization, or company. A leader is defined as commanding a group or an organization (Dictionary.com, 2020). The difference between managers and leaders is that leaders have people follow them and managers have people work for them. In order to be considered successful, a person should display qualities from both areas.

Leader Characteristics

Managers and leaders have different skills that assist in defining which of the two concepts one belongs to. A leader’s skill is to create value, generate creativity, inspire, and motivate innovation (Johnson, 2009). These skills give people the notion to follow the leader. A good leader shows all if not more of these types of skills. A leader does not have people following them because it is required; people follow good leaders by choice. A leader will earn their authority by their own skills, knowledge, and abilities.

When determining when to be a leader or a manager, think of what is trying to be accomplished. An example of a leader needed situation may be a group project or goal that needs to be accomplished; a leader will inspire the group to achieve the goals and to put an efficient amount of work into the project. The leader would help inspire the team to work together and voluntarily achieve goals. Inspiring action and motivation can come from anyone.

Leader Attributes

A leader does not have to be in a position of authority and can range from all aspects of life (Brown, 2010). When thinking of a leader, think of a sports team, its captain, and coach. The captain and coach have different roles; the coach manages the team, positions players, and works out the plays for the game. The captain, on the other end, leads the team with their abilities and work ethic. He motivates the team to work together and reach for the goals of the coach. This is what all leaders do in any situation. The leader leads by example and can get everyone on the same page. The leader in this example is displaying all four leadership styles.

The four styles are leading: by doing, by team, by inspiring, and by empowering (Cassie &, 2011). The four main words explain how each style works. The leader, aka captain, is doing the same tasks as the team and pushing the team mindset, inspiring the other players to strengthen their abilities, and empowering the team to achieve a goal through their personal skills. This is the difference between a leader compared to a manager.

Manager Characteristics

When the word manager is heard, it connects to the boss/employee relationship. This relationship is unauthentic as it is a required relationship (Johnson, 2009). Employees work for the managers but do not follow the manager. A manager is responsible for planning, directing, and overseeing the tasks of their employees and attempting to meet quotas and deadlines (Allman, 2009). Managers are necessary to businesses; unlike the leader role, a manager does not need to inspire work, a manager has the authority to expect and ask for work to be completed. A good manager is planful, sets objectives, and follows through on duties and expectations (Schalm, 2009). A good manager thinks ahead and considers all aspects of impacted parties related to their position, this includes customers, competitors, above leaders, and subordinate employees (Millett, 2012).

Managers Analyzed

A situation to consider would be a department reconstruction. A manager must ensure that positions are covered and staffed, and all related duties to complete reconstruction have been performed. They must also research data that may be important to the reconstruction. This is a tangible task that must be completed, and a leadership style would not fit this type of situation. There are times where tasks outweigh employee motivation. A manager is responsible for ensuring the objectives, duties, and goals are being actively worked on. The good manager plans and orchestrates the employee tasks and follows up on productivity. The manager is essentially providing direction and delegation to the employees that work beneath the manager and provides a consistent productive environment for the employees.

Both leaders and managers are expected to accomplish goals. The way each role achieves this is based on the role. Their differences cover the scope of how to deal with people. At different times each role becomes important, sometimes inspiration is needed versus delegation and vice versa. An individual that contains some of both characteristics and attributes is more effective and efficient in achieving objectives. The ability to lead, grows and produces creative and innovative ideas. The ability manager allows for completion of tasks and duties. The two both achieve goals but at different spectrums by either inspiring or guaranteeing.

References

Allman, S. (2009, October). Leadership vs. management. Successful Meetings, 11, 12.

Brown, J. (2010, January). Leadership vs. management. Supply House Times , 52(11), 118-121.

Cassie, P., &. (2011, January). Leadership styles: A powerful model. Training Journal, 46-51.

Dictionary.com. (2020). Dictionary.com. Retrieved from Dictionary.com: https://www.dictionary.com/

Johnson, R. (2009, June). Are managers leaders or are leaders managers? Supply House Times , 52(4), 66-67.

Millett, S. (2012, September). Thought leader: Why managers must be futurists. New Zealand Management, 21.

Schalm, R. (2009, December). We need fewer leaders, better managers. Canadian HR Reporter, 22(22), 35.