NURS FPX 4020 Assessment 4 Improvement Plan Tool Kit
Phillip April 18, 2024 No Comments

Improvement Plan Tool Kit

NURS FPX 4020 Assessment 4 Improvement Plan Tool Kit

Name

Capella university

NURS-FPX 4020 Improving Quality of Care and Patient Safety

Prof. Name

Date

Improvement Plan Tool Kit

A safety improvement plan requires a handful of information that can be disseminated among the concerned group of people. In healthcare settings, all the information that is gathered for preparing a safety improvement plan is distributed among healthcare professionals, administrators, leaders, and other allied professionals connected with the healthcare facilities. This communication includes information from authentic, credible, and relevant evidence-based resources so that a justified safety improvement plan is implemented. In this assessment, an improvement plan tool kit is developed on medication administration errors (MAEs). The purpose of this resource tool kit is to assist nurses and nurse leaders to implement the medication safety improvement plan with profound knowledge and understanding of the related concepts for achieving successful outcomes.

Resource Tool Kit – Implementation and Sustainability

This resource kit is categorized into four easy-to-understand categories which will help nurses and nurse leaders to specifically take assistance from the source which is related to the particular concern. These categories are:

Categories

Sources

Risk Factors of MAEs Assunção-Costa et al. (2022); Rostami et al. (2019); Wondmieneh et al. (2020)
Nurses’ and Nurse Managers’ Role Abdulmutalib & Safwat (2020); Lappalainen et al. (2019)
Medication Error Reporting Afaya et al. (2021); Mutair et al. (2021); Unal & Intepeler (2019)
Evidence-based Solutions Larson & Lo (2019); Manias et al. (2020); Salar et al. (2020)

Risk Factors of MAEs

Assunção-Costa et al. (2022) conducted a prospective observational study to determine the incidence, nature, and factors associated with medication administration errors. They found that interruptions, excessive workload, and errors in the route of administration were significant factors. Rostami et al. (2019) revealed that medication omission errors are prevalent, especially in patients with a high number of prescribed medications. Wondmieneh et al. (2020) identified lack of training, experience, standardized guidelines, and disruptions as contributing factors to medication administration errors.

Nurses’ and Nurse Managers’ Role

Abdulmutalib & Safwat (2020) describe strategies for reducing medication errors, emphasizing the responsibility of nurses and nurse leaders in error prevention. Lappalainen et al. (2019) found a positive relationship between nurse managers’ transformational leadership style and medication safety.

Medication Error Reporting

Afaya et al. (2021) identified barriers to reporting medication administration errors and recommended creating an enabling environment for reporting. Mutair et al. (2021) emphasized effective strategies to improve reporting systems, highlighting the role of nurse managers in supporting and encouraging reporting. Unal & Intepeler (2019) demonstrated the impact of medical error reporting software on increasing error reporting rates.

Evidence-based Solutions

Larson & Lo (2019) proposed implementing computerized provider order entry and bar-coded medication administration systems to reduce medication errors. Manias et al. (2020) reviewed interventions such as provider education and interprofessional collaboration to reduce medication errors. Salar et al. (2020) outlined strategies for preventing medication errors, including training, medication reconciliation, and accreditation of nurses.

Conclusion

This improvement plan tool kit provides credible resources for stakeholders to implement a safety improvement plan in healthcare settings. By addressing risk factors, enhancing nurses’ roles, improving reporting systems, and implementing evidence-based solutions, organizations can improve medication safety and enhance patient care.

References

Abdulmutalib, I., & Safwat, A. (2020). Nursing strategies for reducing medication errors. Egyptian Journal of Nursing and Health Sciences, 1(1), 26–41. https://doi.org/10.21608/ejnhs.2020.80266

Afaya, A., Konlan, K. D., & Kim Do, H. (2021). Improving patient safety through identifying barriers to reporting medication administration errors among nurses: An integrative review. BMC Health Services Research, 21(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-021-07187-5

Assunção-Costa, L., de Sousa, I. C., Silva, R. K., do Vale, A. C., Pinto, C. R., Machado, J. F., Valli, C. G., & de Souza, L. E. (2022). Observational study on medication administration errors at a University Hospital in Brazil: Incidence, nature, and associated factors. Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice, 15(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s40545-022-00443-x

Lappalainen, M., Härkänen, M., & Kvist, T. (2019). The relationship between nurse manager’s transformational leadership style and medication safety. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 34(2), 357–369. https://doi.org/10.1111/scs.12737

NURS FPX 4020 Assessment 4 Improvement Plan Tool Kit

Larson, K., & Lo, C. (2019). Potential cost savings and reduction of medication errors due to implementation of computerized provider order entry and bar-coded medication administration in the Fraser Health Authority. Univ Br C Med J, 10, 45-46. https://med-fom-ubcmj.sites.olt.ubc.ca/files/2019/03/Commentary-14.pdf

Manias, E., Kusljic, S., & Wu, A. (2020). Interventions to reduce medication errors in adult medical and surgical settings: A systematic review. Therapeutic Advances in Drug Safety, 11, 204209862096830. https://doi.org/10.1177/2042098620968309

Mutair, A. A., Alhumaid, S., Shamsan, A., Zaidi, A. R. Z., Mohaini, M. A., Al Mutairi, A., & Al-Omari, A. (2021). The effective strategies to avoid medication errors and improve reporting systems. Medicines, 8(9), 46. https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines8090046

Nurmeksela, A., Mikkonen, S., Kinnunen, J., & Kvist, T. (2021). Relationships between nurse managers’ work activities, nurses’ job satisfaction, patient satisfaction, and medication errors at the unit level: A correlational study. BMC Health Services Research, 21(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-021-06288-5

Rostami, P., Heal, C., Harrison, A., Parry, G., Ashcroft, D. M., & Tully, M. P. (2019). Prevalence, nature and risk factors for medication administration omissions in English NHS Hospital Inpatients: A retrospective multicentre study using medication safety thermometer data. BMJ Open, 9(6). https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2018-028170

Salar, A., Kiani, F., & Rezaee, N. (2020). Preventing the medication errors in hospitals: A qualitative study. International Journal of Africa Nursing Sciences, 13, 100235. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijans.2020.100235

NURS FPX 4020 Assessment 4 Improvement Plan Tool Kit

Unal, A., & Seren İntepeler, S. (2019). Medical error reporting software program development and its impact on pediatric units’ reporting medical errors. Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences, 36(2). https://doi.org/10.12669/pjms.36.2.732

Wondmieneh, A., Alemu, W., Tadele, N., & Demis, A. (2020). Medication administration errors and contributing factors among nurses: A cross-sectional study in tertiary hospitals, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. BMC Nursing, 19(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12912-020-0397-0