RSCH FPX 7860 Assessment 2 Research Concepts
Phillip April 16, 2024 No Comments

RSCH FPX 7860 Assessment 2 Research Concepts

RSCH FPX 7860 Assessment 2 Research Concepts

Name

Capella University

RSCH FPX 7860 Survey of Research Methods

Prof. Name

Date

Research Concepts

Reference

Purpose of the Study

Statement of the Problem

Limitations

/Implications

Ethical Conduct in the Study

Future Research Possibilities

Garriot, P.O., Hudyma, A., Keene, C. & Santiago, D. (2015) The purpose of this study was to extend the literature on the utility of Lent’s (2004) normative model of well-being in predicting the academic and life satisfaction of college students and to test the full model to replicate past findings with previous samples. Many first-generation college students experience higher education differently than their non-first-generation peers. They may have different qualities than fellow students who aren’t first generation, including being enrolled in college part-time, lower-income, less active in extracurricular activities, and less academically prepared. The sample was not very diverse—it was predominantly white students, which didn’t represent the typical first-generation students, limiting generalizability, and females were overrepresented. Because of the study sites being oriented toward first-generation students, the participants may have reported more support than if they were in other university settings. Researchers gained IRB approval, site permission from university administration, and offered an incentive of entry into a raffle to win one of 10 $25 gift cards. Participants could choose not to answer questions about gender. Future studies could examine actual support rather than just perceived support. A longitudinal study could see long-term effects of support. Research on actual interventions might be useful as well.
Adams, T.L, & McBrayer, J.S. (2000) The purpose of this study was to analyze and examine the experiences of colored students on a predominantly white campus. Many students of color entering as first-generation college students have difficulties connecting to the university and continuing onto graduation. Limitations of this study were the use of student volunteers that participated in the study, who may have been more motivated than typical first-generation college students. Researchers also chose only to interview first-generation students of color. The study was limited to only one location that researchers selected due to accessibility. Researchers in the study gained permission from IRB to conduct this study. Researchers took precautions to avoid any biases and protect the confidentiality of each person who participated. Future research studies could extend the research by including first-generation college students of color from different predominantly white institutions. Another way to extend this study would be to examine the intersectionality of first-generation status with race and ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. Another research possibility could be completing a follow-up study to follow a group of students through the experiences of applying for college, into enrollment, and through the first semester of college.
Xuefei (Nancy) Deng, & Yang, Z. (2021) To evaluate and determine the psychological effects of first-generation students of color in online courses. First-generation students face economic, cultural, and social barriers in their transition to college and navigation throughout their college years. Limitations of this study were the location of the research site and the sample size. Researchers gained IRB approval and used a survey invitation sent out to student participants during the 1st week after online instruction started. The survey was 12 mins and distributed by six professors from 4 departments. 309 out of 500 students completed the study. Future research possibilities for this study could include examining the mechanisms through which digital proficiency explains psychological well-being and examining the causality between digital ability and psychological well-being by using longitudinal data.
Duran, A., Dahl, L. S., Stipeck, C., & Mayhew, M. J. (2020) The purpose of this study is to investigate the environmental factors that affect students’ sense of belonging, especially for those whose race and generation status separate them from the dominant culture. How colleges fail to create environments that honor some students’ cultural backgrounds, impacting their belonging in the process. Limitations of this study include not being nationally representative. The data used in this analysis is cross-sectional, so there is a limitation on the ability to make claims on student growth and student change; the final limitation was how Native American students were used in the samples. Researchers used a critical theory approach in this study to eliminate tensions that are often a product of positivist assumptions. Researchers also used and applied intersectional quantitative philosophies to Astin’s I-E-O model. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to analyze data from 7,888 students. Future research possibilities could include using interviews, focus groups, observations, and expanding to other PWIs. Also, peer debriefing procedures, being more mindful of who reviews and asks questions about the study to find out if the FGCS experiences of microaggression and microaffirmations resonate with the people who serve the student population.
Ellis, J.M., Powell, C.S., Demetriou, C.P., Huerta-Bapta, C., & Panter, A.T. (2019) The purpose of this study is to show how affirmation promotes identity, psychosocial well-being, and fruitful college experiences for students from marginalized groups. There are currently no messages affirming the identities of individuals from marginalized groups available in the research literature. Limitations of this study included assessing FGCS microaggression experiences at only one PWI. Another limitation was using different sources of information, such as interviews, focus groups, etc., to describe microaggression and microaffirmation experiences on campus. Researchers of this study gained permission from their institutions’ review boards. They gathered a list of FGS college students from the registrar and created a study panel online survey to 3,453 college students. Of the 3,454, 524 provided study consent and completed the survey. Future research possibilities could include using interviews, focus groups, observations, and expanding to other PWIs. Also, peer debriefing procedures, being more mindful of who reviews and asks questions about the study to find out if the FGCS experiences of microaggression and microaffirmations resonate with the people who serve the student population.

References:

Garriot, P.O., Hudyma, A., Keene, C., & Santiago, D. (2015). Social cognitive predictors of first and non-first-generation college students’ academic and life satisfaction. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 62(2), 253-263. https://doi.org/10.1037/cou0000066

Adams, T.L., & McBrayer, J.S. (2000). The lived experiences of first-generation college students of color integrating into the institutional culture of a predominantly white institution. The Qualitative Report, 25(3), 733-756. http://library.capella.edu/login?qurl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.proquest.com%2Fscholarlyjournals%2Flived-experiences-first-generation-college%2Fdocview%2F23945397224%2Fse-2

Xuefei (Nancy) Deng, & Yang, Z. (2021). Digital proficiency and psychological well-being in online learning: Experiences of first-generation college students and their peers

. Social Sciences, 10(6), 192. Doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci10060192

Duran, A., Dahl, L.S., Stipeck, C., & Mayhew, M.J. (2020). A critical quantitative analysis of belonging: Perspectives on race, generation status and collegiate environments. Journal of College Student Development, 61(2), 133-153. http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/csd.2020.0014

Ellis, J.M., Powell, C.S., Demetriou, C.P., Huerta-Bapta, C., & Panter, A.T. (2019). Examining first-generation college student lived experiences with microaggressions at a predominantly white public research university. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 25(2), 266-279. https://doi.org/10.1037/cdp0000198