Phillip March 25, 2024 No Comments

TN006 Policy and Regulation Supporting Informatics and Technology

TN006 Policy and Regulation Supporting Informatics and Technology Name  University NURS 6051 Transforming Nursing and Healthcare Through Technology Prof. Name Date Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA): An Overview The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) constitutes a series of governmental regulations designed to protect patients’ health information from unauthorized access or usage (HealthIT.gov, n.d.; U.S. Department of Health & Human Services [HHS], n.d.). HIPAA encompasses several crucial provisions: Protection of Electronic Health Records (EHR): HIPAA safeguards the transmission of electronic health records (HHS, n.d.). Patient Access Rights: It grants patients the right to access their health records (HHS, n.d.). Restrictions on Healthcare Staff: HIPAA limits healthcare personnel on how they can use and access patients’ EHR (HealthIT.gov, n.d.; HHS, n.d.). Impact of HIPAA on Bedside Shift Report (BSR) HIPAA has significant implications for Bedside Shift Report (BSR), including: Mandatory Safeguarding of Patient Information: Nurses are required to safeguard patient personal information under penalty (Gialanella et al., 2017; HHS, n.d.). Legal Reminder for Healthcare Workers: It serves as a legal reminder to healthcare workers to obtain permission before sharing personal medical information in front of family members, visitors, and/or other patients (Malfait et al., 2019; HHS, n.d.). Cost Implications and Ethical Considerations: HIPAA entails cost implications such as redesigning double occupancy rooms to private or semi-private and presents ethical considerations to nurses regarding privacy breaches and the effective communication of information (Malfait et al., 2019; HHS, n.d.; Hoover, 2016). NURS 6051 Assessment 6 TN006 Policy and Regulation Supporting Informatics and Technology Improvements to Bedside Shift Report (BSR) through HIPAA HIPAA also offers avenues for enhancing Bedside Shift Report (BSR), including: Embracing Health Information Technology (HIT): Utilizing HIT to incorporate EHR and facilitate the meaningful use of patient data (Gialanella et al., 2017; HealthIT.gov, n.d.). Reinforcing Patient Privacy Rights: Emphasizing patient privacy rights and the need for permission to share health information in front of family members (Gialanella et al., 2017; Malfait et al., 2019). Empowering Patients: Involving patients in decision-making processes regarding their health information (The Joint Commission [JC], 2017; Malfait et al., 2019). Streamlining Workflow: Streamlining workflow through patient involvement and utilizing checklists integrated into the EHR (Gialanella et al., 2017). Dynamic Dialogue Bedside Shift Report (DDBSR): Implementing an Updated BSR Policy – in Compliance with HIPAA The Dynamic Dialogue Bedside Shift Report (DDBSR) policy aims to engage patients (and their families as appropriate) as active participants in discussing essential patient information during shift handovers. This approach optimizes communication, ensures patient satisfaction, enhances nursing workflow, and protects personal health records and sensitive information. How does DDBSR Meet HIPAA Guidelines? Reducing Information Sharing Errors: By involving the patient, thereby improving workflow and empowering patient involvement in their care plan (JC, 2017; Malfait et al., 2019). Ensuring Safe and Accurate Care: Through the use of EHR and meeting meaningful use of HIT (HealthIT.gov, n.d.; HHS, n.d.). Implementing Security Measures: Such as hard stops with checklists in the EHR and requiring dual nurse sign-on and sign-off to assure patient safety of medical records (Gialanella et al., 2017). Additional Security Layer: Adding an additional security layer with recorded stamps on who accesses patients’ records (Gialanella et al., 2017; Hoover, 2016). References Gialanella, K.M., Mastrian, K., & McGonigle, D. (2017). Legislative Aspects of Nursing Informatics: HITECH and HIPAA. In Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (4th ed., pp. 141-166). Jones & Bartlett Learning. HealthIT.gov. (n.d.). Health IT legislation. https://www.healthit.gov/topic/laws-regulation-andpolicy/health-it-legislation Hoover, R. (2016). Benefits of using an electronic health record. Nursing, 46(7), 21–22. doi: 10.1097/01.NURSE.0000484036.85939.06 The Joint Commission. (2017). Inadequate handoff communication: Sentinel alert event. https://www.jointcommission.org/-/media/tjc/documents/resources/patient-safetytopics/sentinel-event/sea_58_hand_off_comms_9_6_17final(1).pdf.pdf) Malfait, S., Van Hecke, A., Van Biesen, W., & Eeckloo, K. (2019). Is privacy a problem during bedside handovers? A practice-oriented discussion paper. Nursing Ethics, 26(7–8), 2288– 2297. https://doi.org/10.1177/0969733018791348 U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. (n.d.). The HIPAA Privacy Rule. https://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-professionals/privacy/index.html NURS 6051 Assessment 6 TN006 Policy and Regulation Supporting Informatics and Technology

Phillip March 25, 2024 No Comments

TN005 The Nurse Leader and the Systems Development Life Cycle

TN005 The Nurse Leader and the Systems Development Life Cycle Name  University NURS 6051 Transforming Nursing and Healthcare Through Technology Prof. Name Date The Nurse Leader and the Systems Development Life Cycle Introduction Improving healthcare systems is essential for addressing various issues within the industry. The Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC) provides a structured approach to implementing changes effectively. This paper discusses the phases of the SDLC and emphasizes the role of nursing professionals in each stage. Analysis The analysis phase involves identifying and evaluating business processes and needs to understand the underlying issues (McGonigle & Mastrian, 2017). It aims to examine workflows and everyday practices within healthcare organizations to identify areas for improvement. Design During the design phase, the team develops a framework for the data system, considering both high-level and low-level aspects (McGonigle & Mastrian, 2017). This phase involves creating the interface for the users and ensuring compatibility with existing systems. Implementation Implementation is a crucial phase where the developed software or data system is put into action (AlHazme et al., 2014). This involves coding, testing, and deploying the system, often in separate mini-phases to manage complexity effectively. Testing and Maintenance Testing and maintenance ensure the efficiency and effectiveness of the implemented system (McGonigle & Mastrian, 2017). It involves continuous monitoring, testing, and making necessary adjustments to uphold standards and fulfill organizational needs. Nurse Involvement Nurses play a vital role in all phases of the SDLC, contributing their expertise to ensure the success of informatics projects (Nibbelink et al., 2018). Their involvement ensures that the systems developed align with clinical needs and support evidence-based practice. Role of the Graduate Nurse In each stage of the SDLC, graduate nurses play significant roles in contributing to project success: Planning Stage: Identifying issues, analyzing project feasibility, and collaborating with interprofessional teams (McGonigle & Mastrian, 2017). Analysis Stage: Analyzing technical requirements, prioritizing project needs, and reviewing organizational policies (Nibbelink et al., 2018). Design Stage: Developing software configurations, ensuring compatibility, and documenting interactions with existing systems (Darvish et al., 2014). Implementation Stage: Developing code, gathering feedback, and initiating necessary changes for improved performance (AlHazme et al., 2014). Testing and Maintenance Stage: Providing training, offering support, analyzing data for effectiveness, and implementing upgrades as needed (Nibbelink et al., 2018). Conclusion Nursing involvement in informatics projects is crucial for ensuring the development and implementation of effective healthcare solutions. By actively participating in the SDLC, nurses contribute to improving patient care and promoting evidence-based practice. References Darvish, A., Bahramnezhad, F., Keyhanian, S., & Navidhamidi, M. (2014). The role of nursing informatics in promoting quality of health care and the need for appropriate education. Global Journal of Health Science, 6(6), 11–18. https://doi.org/10.5539/gjhs.v6n6p11 Laureate Education (Producer). (2018). Managing health information technology [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author. McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. (2017). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (4th ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning. NURS 6051 Assessment 5 TN005 The Nurse Leader and the Systems Development Life Cycle Nibbelink, C. W., Young, J. R., Carrington, J. M., & Brewer, B. B. (2018). Informatics Solutions for Application of Decision-Making Skills. Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America, 30(2), 237–246. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2018.02.006 Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. (n.d.). Health IT evaluation toolkit and evaluation measures quick reference guide. Retrieved September 27, 2018, from https://healthit.ahrq.gov/health-it-tools-and-resources/evaluation-resources/health-itevaluation-toolkit-and-evaluation-measures-quick-reference Alhazme, R. H., Rana, A. M., & De Lucca, M. (2014). Development and implementation of a clinical and business intelligence system for the Florida health data warehouse. Online Journal of Public Health Informatics, 6(2), e182. https://doi.org/10.5210/ojphi.v6i2.5249 NURS 6051 Assessment 5 TN005 The Nurse Leader and the Systems Development Life Cycle

Phillip March 25, 2024 No Comments

TN004 Technologies Supporting Applied Practice and Optimal Patient Outcomes

TN004 Technologies Supporting Applied Practice and Optimal Patient Outcomes Name  University NURS 6051 Transforming Nursing and Healthcare Through Technology Prof. Name Date Technologies Supporting Applied Practice and Optimal Patient Outcomes The integration of information technology in healthcare has become increasingly vital (Gecomo et al., 2020). Computer utilization has surged across various facets of patient care. Telemedicine, a novel approach in medical and nursing practice, enables the provision of healthcare services remotely, without necessitating an in-person visit (McGonigle & Mastrian, 2017). By leveraging computers, the internet, and wireless communication, telemedicine facilitates healthcare delivery from a distance. Despite encountering challenges such as inadequate internet connectivity and limited universal access to technology (Ftouni et al., 2022), the implementation of telemedicine has proven effective in enhancing health outcomes. This paper examines peer-reviewed research that elucidates the efficacy, outcomes, limitations, and insights gained from the adoption of this technology. Annotated Bibliography Witkowska-Zimny, M., & Nieradko-Iwanicka, B. (2022). Telemedicine in emergency medicine in the COVID-19 pandemic-experiences and prospects-a narrative review. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 19(13). https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19138216 Nakashima, B. J., Kaur, N., Wongjirad, C., Inaba, K., & Sheikh, M. R. (2022). Telemedicine experience of general surgery trainees: impact on patient care and education. The American Surgeon, 88(8), 2017–2023. https://doi.org/10.1177/00031348211023402 Muschol, J., Heinrich, M., Heiss, C., Knapp, G., Repp, H., Schneider, H., Thormann, U., Uhlar, J., Unzeitig, K., & Gissel, C. (2022). Assessing telemedicine efficiency in follow-up care with video consultations for patients in orthopedic and trauma surgery in Germany: randomized controlled trial. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 24(7), e36996. https://doi.org/10.2196/36996 Scofano, R., Monteiro, A., & Motta, L. (2022). Evaluation of the experience with the use of telemedicine in a home dialysis program-a qualitative and quantitative study. BMC Nephrology, 23(1), 190. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12882-022-02824-5 Morcillo Serra, C., Aroca Tanarro, A., Mary Cummings, C., Jimenez Fuertes, A., & Tomás Martínez, J. F. (2022). Impact on the reduction of CO2 emissions due to the use of telemedicine. Scientific Reports, 12(1), 1–6. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-16864-2 References Ftouni, R., AlJardali, B., Hamdanieh, M., Ftouni, L., & Salem, N. (2022). Challenges of telemedicine during the COVID-19 pandemic: A systematic review. BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, 22(1), 207. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12911-022-01952-0 Gecomo, J. G., Klopp, A., & Rouse, M. (2020). Implementation of an evidence-based electronic health record (EHR) downtime readiness and recovery plan. Retrieved from https://www.himss.org/resources/implementation-evidence-based-electronic-health-record-ehr-downtime-readiness-and Grossman, D. (2022). Telemedicine provision of medication abortion. American Journal of Public Health, 112(9), 1282–1283. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2022.306995 McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. (2017). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (4th ed.). Jones & Bartlett Learning. NURS 6051 Assessment 4 TN004 Technologies Supporting Applied Practice and Optimal Patient Outcomes

Phillip March 25, 2024 No Comments

TN003 Data to Information to Knowledge to Wisdom

TN003 Data to Information to Knowledge to Wisdom Name  University NURS 6051 Transforming Nursing and Healthcare Through Technology Prof. Name Date Practice Statement As a prospective Informatics Nurse Specialist (INS), it is imperative to acknowledge the profound impact recent technological advancements have had on Electronic Health Records (EHRs). The transition from traditional paper charts to EHRs, accompanied by the introduction of standardized nursing terminologies (SNTs), has significantly propelled and enriched the nursing profession. This paper aims to elucidate the role of data and information in shaping knowledge within nursing practice, examine the variability of this knowledge across healthcare systems, and assess the potential implications of such disparities on nursing standards. Furthermore, it will delve into the significance of SNTs, exploring both their advantages and disadvantages in implementation. Data and Information to Knowledge of Nursing Practice Data and information derived from nursing documentation, whether in paper format or EHRs, serve as fundamental building blocks for knowledge within nursing practice. Nursing documentation offers insights into nurses’ problem-solving methodologies and demonstrates the efficacy of nursing interventions. Central to the principles of nursing practice is the process of gathering pertinent data, synthesizing information alongside existing knowledge, analyzing clinical scenarios, and disseminating resulting insights to fellow healthcare providers. This iterative process, mirrored in nursing documentation, underscores its role as a measurable indicator of quality. Researchers and INSs leverage data and information from both paper and electronic records to evaluate and standardize the quality of nursing care, thereby enriching the collective knowledge base of nursing practice. NURS 6051 Assessment 3 TN003 Data to Information to Knowledge to Wisdom Standards for Nursing The divergence in health record systems across healthcare institutions, including the adoption of EHRs, necessitated the establishment of standards for nursing documentation. Prior to the inception of the North American Nursing Diagnosis (NANDA) in 1973, a universal language for conveying nursing care was absent (Rutherford, 2008). Subsequently, various sets of SNTs specific to nursing practice received approval from the American Nurses Association, addressing this gap in standardized nursing language (Rutherford, 2008). Discrepancies in the understanding of nursing practice underscored the imperative for standardizing nursing language, which also serves as a catalyst for nursing research. Consequently, healthcare organizations began integrating SNTs to bolster evidence-based nursing practice (Macieira et al., 2017). Standardized Nursing Terminologies SNTs, regarded as “common data elements” within EHRs, hold immense potential for advancing both big data science and the nursing profession (The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, 2017; Macieira et al., 2017). By employing SNTs in nursing documentation, a standardized language is cultivated, facilitating seamless data sharing and comparison. This uniform terminology effectively communicates the impact of nursing interventions on patient outcomes, thereby fostering nursing research (Lundberg et al., 2008; Rutherford, 2008). Essentially, the utilization of SNTs in documenting patient care transforms such documentation into retrievable data that embodies nursing practice and clinical judgment. The integration of SNTs is indispensable, as it propels nursing practice research, ultimately enhancing patient outcomes. Benefits and Challenges of Implementation One notable benefit of SNT implementation lies in its facilitation of nursing-specific research endeavors. Nursing data encoded with SNTs not only accelerates the advancement of nursing practice knowledge but also streamlines data processing compared to unstructured data formats (Macieira et al., 2017). The adoption of SNTs translates to time and workload savings, enabling swift data retrieval and processing. Conclusion As a prospective INS, recognizing the benefits and challenges associated with SNTs and their implementation is paramount. Engaging in the study of nursing informatics and acquainting oneself with prevailing SNT frameworks can significantly benefit both academic pursuits and professional endeavors. Armed with this foundational knowledge, future INSs hold the potential to effect positive transformations within EHR systems. References Abdelhak, M., Grostick, S., & Hanken, M. A. (2014). Health information management of a strategic resource. Elsevier Health Sciences. Glassman, K. S. (2017). Using data in nursing practice. American Nurse Today, 12(11). Lundberg, C., Warren, J., Brokel, J., Bulechek, G., Butcher, H., McCloskey Dochterman, J., … & Spisla, C. (2008). Selecting a standardized terminology for the electronic health record that reveals the impact of nursing on patient care. Online Journal of Nursing Informatics, 12(2). Macieira, T. G. R., Smith, M. B., Davis, N., Yao, Y., Wilkie, D., Lopez, K. D., & Keenan, G. (2017). Evidence of progress in making nursing practice visible using standardized nursing data: A systematic review. AMIA Annual Symposium Proceedings, 1205–1214. McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. (2017). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (4th ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning. Rutherford, M. (2008). Standardized nursing language: What does it mean for nursing practice. OJIN: The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 13(1), 243-50. The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. (2017). Standard nursing terminologies: A landscape analysis. https://www.healthit.gov/sites/default/files/snt_final_05302017.pdf NURS 6051 Assessment 3 TN003 Data to Information to Knowledge to Wisdom

Phillip March 25, 2024 No Comments

TN002 The Role of the Nurse Informaticist in Healthcare

TN002 The Role of the Nurse Informaticist in Healthcare Name  University NURS 6051 Transforming Nursing and Healthcare Through Technology Prof. Name Date The Role of the Nurse Informaticist in Healthcare Executive Summary Patient outcomes, quality of care, and cost-effectiveness are pivotal aspects in healthcare delivery. With technology’s pervasive influence, nursing informatics emerges as a crucial discipline for managing data and knowledge transfer in nursing practice (McGonigle & Mastrian, 2017). Nurse informaticists play a vital role in integrating data, thereby facilitating improved healthcare delivery (Ali et al., 2018). This proposal advocates for the implementation of an electronic nurse handoff report at the patient’s bedside, leveraging health information technology (HIT) to enhance communication and patient-centered care. Proposal: Establishing an Electronic Nurse Handoff Report at the Patient’s Bedside Bedside reports aim to enhance patient engagement and satisfaction by facilitating communication between healthcare providers and patients (Dorvil, 2018). Introducing an electronic nurse bedside handoff report can improve communication, collaboration, and ultimately patient safety and satisfaction. Education and training for nurses and patients are essential for successful implementation (De Veer et al., 2011). Real-time data integration into the electronic health record (EHR) provides a comprehensive overview of patient status and care plans, fostering transparency and continuity of care. Stakeholders Impacted Implementing an electronic nurse bedside handoff report impacts patients, families, nurses, and nursing leaders. Studies indicate that bedside handoff reports increase patient engagement and reduce anxiety among patients (Manges & Groves, 2019). Nurse leaders play a crucial role in providing resources and support for project implementation (Skiba, 2016). Nurse informaticists are instrumental in guiding the integration of technology and ensuring optimal outcomes. Efficiency Electronic bedside handoff reports streamline care transitions, minimize medical errors, and improve patient outcomes (Manges & Groves, 2019). Real-time access to patient data facilitates informed decision-making and enhances nursing efficiency (Alotaibi & Federico, 2017). Strong nurse-patient communication fosters trust and satisfaction, contributing to improved patient experiences. Technologies Required For Implementation Implementation of electronic nurse bedside handoff reports necessitates an EHR system and various devices such as smartphones, tablets, and laptops for data input and access (Dorvil, 2018). Nurse informaticists play a crucial role in designing and implementing EHR systems to meet the needs of healthcare organizations (Ali et al., 2018). Incorporate the Informatics Nurse Specialist in the Project Team The project team should include nurse managers, trainers, RNs, and nurse informaticists. Nurse informaticists contribute to project success by ensuring effective use of technology and providing ongoing support and training (Ali et al., 2018). Conclusion Nursing informatics plays a vital role in enhancing patient outcomes and improving healthcare delivery. Transitioning to electronic nurse bedside handoff reports enhances communication, patient safety, and satisfaction. Nurse informaticists are essential for integrating technology into nursing practice and ensuring successful project implementation. References Ali, R. A., Benjamin, K., Munir, S., & Ahmed, N. (2018). A review of informatics competencies tools for nurses and nurse managers. Can J Nurs Inf, 13(1), 1. doi:10.1097/01.NEP.0000000000000092. Alotaibi, Y. K., & Federico, F. (2017). The impact of health information technology on patient safety. Saudi medical journal, 38(12), 1173. De Veer, A. J., Fleuren, M. A., Bekkema, N., & Francke, A. L. (2011). Successful implementation of new technologies in nursing care: a questionnaire survey of nurse users. BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, 11(1), 1-12. Dorvil, B. (2018). The secrets to successful nurse bedside shift report implementation and sustainability. Nursing management, 49(6), 20. NURS 6051 Assessment 2 TN002 The Role of the Nurse Informaticist in Healthcare Manges, K. A., & Groves, P. S. (2019). Exploring the hidden functions of nursing bedside shift report: A performance, ritual, and sensemaking opportunity. Journal of Nursing Care Quality, 34(3), 256-262. McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. (2017). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge. Jones & Bartlett Publishers. Skiba, D. J. (2016). Informatics competencies for nurses revisited. Nursing Education Perspectives, 37(6), 365-367. Small, D. C., & Fitzpatrick, J. J. (2017). Nurse perceptions of traditional and bedside shift report. Nursing management, 48(2), 44-49. NURS 6051 Assessment 2 TN002 The Role of the Nurse Informaticist in Healthcare

Phillip March 25, 2024 No Comments

TN001 What is Informatics?

TN001 What is Informatics? Name  University NURS 6051 Transforming Nursing and Healthcare Through Technology Prof. Name Date The Concept of a Knowledge Worker The term “knowledge worker” was originally coined by Peter Drucker in his 1959 book, Landmarks of Tomorrow (McGonigle & Mastrian, 2017). A knowledge worker is defined as an individual with advanced formal education capable of applying theoretical and analytical knowledge (McGonigle & Mastrian, 2017). According to Drucker, these workers must be continuous learners, specialists in their field, and spend at least 50% of their work time searching and evaluating information (McGonigle & Mastrian, 2017). Effective knowledge workers thrive in multidisciplinary teams characterized by members with complementary knowledge bases and strong problem-solving and decision-making skills (McGonigle & Mastrian, 2017). Nursing Informatics and the Role of a Nurse Leader as a Knowledge Worker Nursing informatics is a specialized area within nursing where professionals contribute to the development and enhancement of information technology in nursing practice (McGonigle & Mastrian, 2017). Examples include electronic medication administration records and electronic patient admission history records. As knowledge workers, nurse leaders gather and analyze information to design improved patient outcomes (McGonigle & Mastrian, 2017). Scenario In nursing practice, data collection is standard upon admission and during each shift. This data encompasses patients’ histories, diagnoses, vital signs, laboratory values, intake and output, provider notes, and nurses’ notes, all stored in the electronic health chart, EPIC. For instance, a nurse on a medical/surgical floor in a community hospital might train another nurse on proper medication administration and the use of electronic medication administration records (eMAR) (McGonigle & Mastrian, 2017). NURS 6051 Assessment 1 TN001 What is Informatics? Problem from the Viewpoint of a Nurse Informaticist The utilization of data, particularly blood pressure values entered into flowsheets, is crucial for ensuring medication administration safety (McGonigle & Mastrian, 2017). This data must be manually collected and entered into flowsheets for access by the eMAR system. From this data, insights into patients’ blood pressure trends and knowledge regarding blood pressure medication administration can be derived (McGonigle & Mastrian, 2017). Clinical Reasoning and Judgment of Nurse Leader Nurse leaders employ clinical reasoning and judgment by applying derived knowledge to solve problems and improve patient outcomes (McGonigle & Mastrian, 2017). Interpreting data is essential for providing optimal care and enhancing patient outcomes through effective coordination and communication (Nagle, Sermeus, & Junger, 2017). References McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. (2017). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (4th ed.). Jones & Bartlett Learning. Nagle, L. M., Sermeus, W., & Junger, A. (2017). Evolving role of the nursing informatics specialist. In J. Murphy et al. (Eds.), Forecasting competencies for nurses in the future of connected health (pp. 212–221). NURS 6051 Assessment 1 TN001 What is Informatics?

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