Phillip March 28, 2024 No Comments

HIS FPX 1150 Assessment 5 History in the Movie, Fact or Fiction

HIS FPX 1150 Assessment 5 History in the Movie, Fact or Fiction Name Capella University HIS FPX 1150 History Prof. Name Date History in Cinema: Authenticity vs. Creative Interpretation Two distinct settings unfold in the film: the salvage ship and the RMS Titanic. The narrative commences with footage capturing salvage ship activities, where treasure hunters led by Brock Lovett aim to unveil a necklace called The Heart of the Ocean (Tran, Hwang, & Jung, 2017). Their quest leads them to the wreckage of the Titanic in the Atlantic Ocean, revealing a nude portrayal of a female adorned with the necklace, the date indicating 14th April 1912—the precise day the Titanic sank after colliding with an iceberg. Movie Synopsis The elderly Rose Dawson and her granddaughter join Brock Lovett’s salvage team to explore the RMS Titanic. The RMS Titanic features expansive indoor and outdoor sections, with the upper deck showcasing luxurious spaces like a hotel, a church, VIP rooms, and more. The film underscores the class distinctions on the Titanic, contrasting the opulent upper class with the modest lower class through their accommodations and surroundings. Analysis of the Film The film effectively captures the audience’s attention, utilizing mise-en-scène to convey the romance and tragedy of the Titanic (Tiara & Humanika, 2021). The meticulous selection of settings, makeup, costumes, lighting, and character actions exemplifies the filmmakers’ dedication. The film portrays the stark contrast between social classes, masterfully using lighting to depict characters’ moods and emotions. The film delves into the emotional impact of the Titanic’s sinking, highlighting moments of love and sacrifice. The class divide is vividly portrayed, with lower-class individuals enjoying local music, while the upper class indulges in sophisticated entertainment like violin and piano performances. Movie’s Impact on Public Perception The film’s release in 1942 coincides with the actual Titanic disaster in 1912, prompting scrutiny of the historical event. The film raises awareness about the Titanic’s flawed construction and the subsequent need for improvements in shipbuilding materials and safety regulations (Montano & Carr, 2021). HIS FPX 1150 Assessment 5 History in the Movie, Fact or Fiction The public becomes informed about the structural issues in the Titanic, emphasizing the use of substandard materials. The film contributes to discussions on improving vessel designs, materials, and safety measures, ultimately influencing the shipping industry’s practices. Proposed Enhancements to the Titanic Film To enhance the film’s accuracy, incorporating double hull steel construction in the Titanic’s manufacturing is recommended (Kurzbaum et al., 2019). Improved steel plates and riveting, along with fully sealed bulkheads, would mitigate the risks of accidents and shipwrecks. The screenplay should also address national and international ship care facilities. Conclusion The film Titanic not only entertains but also sparks discussions about historical events and societal issues. Its impact on public understanding prompts reflections on disaster prevention and the importance of stringent safety measures in maritime history. References Escher, A., Karner, M., & Rapp, H. (2021). Cinematic cruising: Reel imagination and real experience for pleasure on the high seas. Tourism and Hospitality Research, 146735842110117. https://doi.org/10.1177/14673584211011711 Kurzbaum, E., Iliasafov, L., Kolik, L., Starosvetsky, J., Bilanovic, D., Butnariu, M., & Armon, R. (2019). From the Titanic and other shipwrecks to biofilm prevention: The interesting role of polyphenol-protein complexes in biofilm inhibition. Science of the Total Environment, 658, 1098–1105. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.12.197 Montano, S., & Carr, J. (2021). The Landscape of Disaster Film: 2000–2020. Disasters. https://doi.org/10.1111/disa.12482 Tran, Q. D., Hwang, D., & Jung, J. J. (2017). Character-based indexing and browsing with movie ontology1. Journal of Intelligent & Fuzzy Systems, 32(2), 1229–1240. https://doi.org/10.3233/jifs-169122 Tran, Q. D., Hwang, D., Lee, O-Joun., & Jung, J. E. (2016). Exploiting character networks for movie summarization. Multimedia Tools and Applications, 76(8), 10357–10369. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11042-016-3633-6 HIS FPX 1150 Assessment 5 History in the Movie, Fact or Fiction

Phillip March 28, 2024 No Comments

HIS FPX 1150 Assessment 4 Living History

HIS FPX 1150 Assessment 4 Living History Name Capella University HIS FPX 1150 History Prof. Name Date Living History The expectations imposed on women during the 18th and 19th centuries often relegated them to servitude to their husbands rather than recognizing them as life partners (Purvis, 2019). These women were obligated to fulfill tasks assigned by their husbands, making their lives challenging with numerous responsibilities. Current circumstances compel women to resist and initiate a movement known as women’s suffrage, demonstrating their readiness to confront challenges and secure equal rights. Women face considerable restrictions in obtaining fundamental rights such as education, employment, legal rights, and custody of infants, prompting them to mobilize a movement for women’s suffrage. The women’s suffrage movement led to economic and political reforms, including the right to vote in elections, particularly in the United States (Lange, 2021). In 1840, pioneers Cady and Mott conducted a women’s rights session in the United States, strengthening the suffrage movement with the support of dedicated women. Their collective efforts aimed to secure equal rights for women, fostering an environment where women could actively participate in conventions to combat the injustices of slavery. Description of Historical Movement In the 18th century, Ancient Greece and Republican Rome excluded women’s voting rights, a trend that persisted in the United Kingdom and Europe until 1832 (Kitch, 2017). Despite the difficulties in accessing women’s rights in the 19th century, women persevered in Great Britain and the United States. By the early 20th century, countries such as New Zealand, Australia, Finland, and the United States granted women the right to vote in national elections. HIS FPX 1150 Assessment 4 Living History Following World War I, a surge in female electoral laws occurred, particularly in Europe, with 28 countries ensuring women’s equal voting rights (Lemay et al., 2019). Noteworthy nations include Canada, Germany, Austria, Poland, the United States, Hungary, Britain, Burma, Ecuador, South Africa, Brazil, Uruguay, Thailand, Turkey, Cuba, and the Philippines. These countries granted women the right to vote at various levels, from municipal to national elections. Historical Movement and Personal Impacts Post-World War II saw women from France, Italy, Romania, Yugoslavia, and China negotiating for their rights through the women’s suffrage movement (Bredbenner, 2018). In 1949, Indian women gained their rights, followed by Pakistani women in 1956. Today, over 100 countries grant women equal voting rights, with Switzerland allowing women to cast ballots at the federal level. While the United States recognizes women’s voting rights, women from the United States and the United Kingdom continue to play influential roles in advancing women’s rights at all levels. Suffrage and the Great Depression The inaugural women’s rights convention in New York in 1848 marked a pivotal moment in the suffrage movement’s history, garnering momentum through social gatherings and newspaper advertisements (Germain et al., 2019). The convention emphasized equality for women and men in all aspects of life, including trade, business, commerce, and professions. It addressed issues such as equal land distribution laws for all social classes, promoting the security and protection of women’s rights. Potential Impact on the Future The 19th Amendment, focusing on women’s rights, empowered women to participate in political movements, significantly increasing voter turnout (Kroeger, 2017). The women’s suffrage campaign aimed to broaden the narrative and potential of women’s rights, demanding fair and just treatment in politics at various levels. The movement sought to establish unity among women worldwide, fostering political liberty globally. Serving as a breakthrough, the women’s suffrage movement has brought about transformative changes in women’s lives by securing voting rights at all election levels, eliminating gender discrimination in most states. References Bredbenner, C. L. (2018). A Nationality of Her Own: Women, Marriage, and the Law of Citizenship. Univ of California Press. Germain, M.-L., Robertson, P., & Minnis, S. (2019). Protests, Rallies, Marches, and Social Movements as Organizational Change Agents. Advances in Developing Human Resources, 21(2), 150–174. Kitch, C. (2017). “A living archive of modern protest”: Memory-making in the Women’s March. Popular Communication, 16(2), 119–127. Kroeger, B. (2017). The Suffragents: How Women Used Men to Get the Vote. SUNY Press. Lange, A. K. (2021). Picturing Political Power: Images in the Women’s Suffrage Movement. University of Chicago Press. Lemay, K. C., Goodier, S., Jones, M., & Tetrault, L. (2019). Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence. Princeton University Press. Purvis, J. (2019). Did militancy help or hinder the granting of women’s suffrage in Britain?. Women’s History Review, 28(7), 1200–1234. HIS FPX 1150 Assessment 4 Living History

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HIS FPX 1150 Assessment 3 Lesson from History

HIS FPX 1150 Assessment 3 Lesson from History Name Capella University HIS FPX 1150 History Prof. Name Date Lessons from History History teaches us many lessons and guides us to make decisions in the present and future. Although many events in the History of the U.S. have given us lessons on how to work in the future, this presentation focuses on women’s rights. Chosen Issue and Primary Research Question One issue that could be examined is the fight for women’s suffrage in the United States. The main research question could be: What are some of the ongoing concerns regarding women’s rights in the US that are reminiscent of those that prompted the suffrage movement, despite some progress being made in this area? Sub Questions Some sub-questions that could help answer this main question include: Is there equal treatment for men and women in the workplace? Have opportunities and perceptions for women improved? Are women holding significant positions in shaping public policy? What is the current role of women in politics in the United States? How would leaders from the suffrage movement view women’s rights today? By answering these sub-questions, we can gain a better understanding of how suffragists were able to successfully advocate for their rights and ultimately achieve their goal of gaining the right to vote. Overview The fight for women’s suffrage in the United States was long and challenging; that began in the mid-19th century and concluded with the passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution in 1920. Understanding this historical event and its long-term impact requires a comprehensive analysis of various aspects, including the social, political, and cultural context of the time, the key individuals and groups involved, and the strategies and tactics employed to achieve the goal of women’s suffrage. Credibility of Resources Addams, J. (1915). Modern History Sourcebooks: Jane Addams: Why Women Should Vote, 1915. Retrieved from: https://sourcebooks.fordham.edu/mod/1915janeadams-vote.asp Walton, M. (N.D). A Woman’s War. Retrieved from: www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/the-great-war-woman’s-war/ Interchange: Women’s suffrage, the Nineteenth Amendment, and the right to vote. (2019). Journal of American History, 106(3), 662–694. https://doi.org/10.1093/jahist/jaz506 Miller G. (2008). Women’s suffrage, political responsiveness, and child survival in American history. The quarterly journal of Economics, 123(3), 1287–1327. https://doi.org/10.1162/qjec.2008.123.3.1287 HIS FPX 1150 Assessment 3 Lesson from History Causes and Long-term Impacts Women’s suffrage is the term used to describe the legal right of women to participate in elections by casting their vote. Historically, women were not allowed to vote in many societies, including ancient Greece and Rome as well as some early European democracies. (Britannica 2023). In the United States, it took nearly a century of activism and campaigning for women to finally win this right (History.com Editors, n.d.). One significant long-term effect of women’s suffrage has been greater political equality between men and women. As more women became eligible to vote, their numbers at the polls grew steadily. Research has also shown that after American women gained the right to vote, there was a decrease in child mortality rates by up to 15 percent and an increase in both school funding and enrollment (Britannica, 2020). Relating Past Challenges and Strategies to A Current Organizational Issue Women in present-day America still face challenges regarding general perception and acceptance as working individuals. For American women, work-family balance is a particular issue (Kim et al., 2023). Historical research into the struggles of women during the 18th and 19th centuries can provide valuable context for understanding these issues today. By examining the lives and aspirations of women in those eras, their experiences with war and poverty, and the support (or lack thereof) they received from men, we can better understand how these challenges have evolved over time. This historical research can inform strategies for addressing current organizational issues related to gender equality and work-family balance. For example, organizations can develop policies and programs that support work-family balance by understanding the pressures that women with children face in managing their family and work lives. Programs could include flexible work arrangements or on-site childcare. Additionally, by recognizing the need for men to be supportive and encouraging to both housewives and working wives, organizations can promote a culture of gender equality. Conclusion Historical research into the struggles of women can provide valuable context for understanding current challenges related to gender equality and work-family balance. By examining the past and learning from it, organizations can develop policies and programs that support work-family balance and promote a culture of gender equality. References Britannica, T. Editors of Encyclopaedia (2020, September 25). Causes and Effects of Women’s Suffrage in the United States. Encyclopedia Britannica. https://www.britannica.com/summary/Causes-and-Effects-of-Womens-Suffrage-in-the-United-States Britannica, T. Editors of Encyclopaedia (2023, February 22). Women’s suffrage. Encyclopedia Britannica. https://www.britannica.com/topic/woman-suffrage History.com Editors. (n.d.). Women’s Suffrage. HISTORY; A&E Television Networks. Retrieved March 10, 2023, from https://www.history.com/topics/womens-history/the-fight-for-womens-suffrage Kim, M., Ma, E., & Wang, L. (2023). Work-family supportive benefits, programs, and policies and employee well-being: Implications for the hospitality industry. International Journal of Hospitality Management, 108, 103356. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijhm.2022.103356 HIS FPX 1150 Assessment 3 Lesson from History

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HIS FPX 1150 Assessment 2 Historical Analysis

HIS FPX 1150 Assessment 2 Historical Analysis Name Capella University HIS FPX 1150 History Prof. Name Date Historical Analysis In examining the economic transformation within the United States, the focus lies on enhancing the overall financial state of the country (Marist.edu, 2020). As the economy undergoes shifts, effective resource utilization and the pursuit of increased revenues become imperative. Consequently, the foundations can generate a capital stock, requiring a balanced consideration of all modalities for a successful economic transformation. To propel the economy forward, tax cuts become essential, signaling a potential evolution in the economy to a greater degree. The emphasis is placed on repurposing existing infrastructure in tandem with the economic expansion rate. The rapid economic development leads to increased employment, fostering improved economic growth through shareholder involvement. Credibility of Sources The primary source, dating back to 1917, advocates for self-sufficiency among individuals who, despite relying on others for assistance, find themselves depleted of resources. The essay’s central goal is to amplify the desire of individuals to fully realize their potential and break free from their current circumstances. It focuses on Americans who chose to leave the United States for the South in pursuit of a better economic future. Despite recent controversies surrounding the author’s books, the writer remains unfazed, maintaining an impartial stance while discussing real-world occurrences. Published in 1933, the source serves as a primary reference, shedding light on the significance of America’s banking system, where consumers utilize accounts for deposits and fund transfers at reputable financial institutions. The source aims to illustrate how financial organizations perform monetary tasks and provide diverse services to the public. Despite challenges posed by the approaching weekend, the author, absent at the time of recording, maintains a commitment to promoting people’s well-being. Impacts of Historical Events A period of transition marked the American economy from 1916 to 1921, with South American citizens experiencing the lowest quality of life due to financial constraints (Npr.org, 2019). Efforts to enhance the present economic climate and quality of life include individuals seeking opportunities to rapidly sell their services, reflecting the observed economic changes. Impacts of Historical Events (Cont.) The integration of Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) further enhances economic stability. However, the evidence lacks coverage on natural resources and the role of women in the economy. Efforts are directed towards enabling women to contribute economically to their communities. HIS FPX 1150 Assessment 2 Historical Analysis Critical Thinking Observations reveal that the materials provided emphasize the commonality that individuals must offer their skills in the marketplace to lead a good lifestyle (Historymatters.gmu.edu, n.d.). Rather than passively waiting for assistance, taking proactive steps is considered a prudent approach. Discrepancies in sources and information indicate that women’s efficiency in the workplace remains underutilized. The efficient utilization of female participation is deemed more likely to achieve economic progress goals within the specified timeframe. To impede the rate of economic change, the presentation suggests assigning greater weight to the inherent capabilities of the workforce as a whole, with an increased focus on incorporating women. References Historymatters.gmu.edu. (n.d.). “Sir I Will Thank You with All My Heart”: Seven Letters from the Great Migration. [online] Available at: http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5332/ [Accessed 20 Feb. 2020]. Marist.edu. (2020). On the Bank Crisis – March 12,1933. [online] Available at: http://docs.fdrlibrary.marist.edu/031233.html. Npr.org. (2019). NPR Choice page. [online] Available at: https://www.npr.org/2014/01/27/267145552/the-middle-class-took-off-100-years-ago-thanks-to-henry-ford. HIS FPX 1150 Assessment 2 Historical Analysis

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